Foreign words in English language

 Foreign words commonly used in the English language

  1. Bon appétit (French) – “Enjoy your meal.”
  2. Fiasco (Italian) – A complete failure or disaster.
  3. Zeitgeist (German) – The spirit of the times; the general trend or mood of a particular period.
  4. Déjà vu (French) – The feeling of having already experienced the present situation.
  5. RSVP (French) – An abbreviation for “Répondez s’il vous plaît,” which means “Please respond” or “Kindly reply.”
  6. C’est la vie (French) – “That’s life” or “Such is life,” expressing acceptance of a situation or resignation to fate.
  7. Hasta la vista (Spanish) – “Until we meet again” or “Goodbye.”
  8. Ad nauseam (Latin) – To the point of sickness or disgust, often used to describe something that is repeated excessively.
  9. Voilà (French) – “There it is” or “There you have it,” often used to present or introduce something.
  10. Bon voyage (French) – “Have a good trip” or “Safe travels.”
  11. Bazaar (Persian) – A marketplace or a fair where goods are sold.
  12. Fiesta (Spanish) – A festive celebration or party.
  13. Kindergarten (German) – A preschool or a school for young children before they start formal education.
  14. Cliché (French) – An overused phrase, expression, or idea.
  15. Karaoke (Japanese) – A form of entertainment in which people sing along to recorded music.
  16. Laissez-faire (French) – A policy or attitude of non-interference or non-intervention.
  17. Espresso (Italian) – A strong coffee brewed by forcing hot water under high pressure through finely ground coffee beans.
  18. Fiancé/Fiancée (French) – A person engaged to be married (fiancé for males, fiancée for females).
  19. Schadenfreude (German) – Pleasure derived from someone else’s misfortune.
  20. Ménage à trois (French) – A domestic arrangement or relationship involving three people, typically a sexual or romantic relationship.
  21. Prima donna (Italian) – A temperamental or demanding person, especially in a professional setting.
  22. Taboo (Polynesian) – Something that is prohibited or forbidden due to social or cultural reasons.
  23. Guru (Sanskrit) – A spiritual teacher, guide, or expert in a particular field.
  24. Zen (Japanese) – A school of Buddhism that emphasizes meditation and intuition.
  25. Bungalow (Hindi) – A low, single-story house or cottage, typically with a veranda.
  26. Carte blanche (French) – Complete freedom or authority to act as one wishes.
  27. Drama (Greek) – A genre of literature or performance that involves conflict, emotions, and tension.
  28. Chutzpah (Yiddish) – Confidence, audacity, or nerve, often used to describe someone who is bold or daring.
  29. Ciao (Italian) – An informal greeting or goodbye, similar to “hello” or “goodbye.”
  30. Sauna (Finnish) – A small room or space designed for dry or wet heat sessions to promote relaxation and wellness.
  31. Fiesta (Spanish) – A festive celebration or party.
  32. Versus (Latin) – Used to indicate a competition or contest between two parties.
  33. Baguette (French) – A long, narrow loaf of bread, often associated with French cuisine.
  34. Paparazzi (Italian) – Photographers who follow celebrities to capture candid or intrusive photographs.
  35. Décor (French) – The style, arrangement, and overall appearance of a space or room.
  36. Tycoon (Japanese) – A wealthy and powerful person, often in the business or industrial sector.
  37. Sushi (Japanese) – A Japanese dish consisting of vinegared rice combined with various toppings, typically including raw or cooked fish.
  38. Adios (Spanish) – “Goodbye” or “Farewell.”
  39. Genre (French) – A category or type, particularly in art, literature, or music.
  40. Fiesta (Spanish) – A festive celebration or party.
  41. Karma (Sanskrit) – The sum of a person’s actions in one’s current and previous lives, believed to influence future experiences.
  42. Hors d’oeuvre (French) – A small appetizer or snack served before a meal.
  43. Siesta (Spanish) – A short nap or rest taken in the early afternoon, particularly in hot climates.
  44. Safari (Swahili) – An expedition, often to observe or hunt wildlife, typically in Africa.
  45. Faux pas (French) – A social mistake or blunder, often violating accepted customs or norms.
  46. Croissant (French) – A buttery, crescent-shaped pastry typically associated with French cuisine.
  47. Bazaar (Arabic) – A market or a street of shops selling various goods.
  48. Kudos (Greek) – Praise, recognition, or acclaim for an achievement or accomplishment.
  49. Karate (Japanese) – A martial art form characterized by striking and kicking techniques.
  50. Macho (Spanish) – Describing a man who is aggressively masculine or displays exaggerated male traits.
  51. In vino veritas (Latin) – “In wine, there is truth,” often used to imply that people are more honest or truthful when they are intoxicated.
  52. Gestalt (German) – An organized whole that is perceived as more than the sum of its parts.
  53. Coup d’état (French) – A sudden and often violent overthrow of a government or a seizure of power by a small group.
  54. Hoi polloi (Greek) – The common people or the masses.
  55. Bonsai (Japanese) – The art of growing miniature trees in containers.
  56. Al fresco (Italian) – Outdoors, often used to describe dining or eating outside.
  57. Bonjour (French) – “Hello” or “Good day.”
  58. Cliché (French) – An overused phrase, expression, or idea.
  59. Fjord (Norwegian) – A long, narrow inlet with steep sides, typically formed by glacial activity.
  60. Décor (French) – The style, arrangement, and overall appearance of a space or room.
  61. Zeitgeist (German) – The spirit of the times; the general trend or mood of a particular period.
  62. Komorebi (Japanese) – The interplay of sunlight filtering through the leaves of trees.
  63. Doppelgänger (German) – A look-alike or double of a person, often used to describe someone who closely resembles another.
  64. Wanderlust (German) – A strong desire to travel and explore the world.
  65. Hasta mañana (Spanish) – “See you tomorrow.”
  66. Blitz (German) – A sudden, intensive attack or campaign.
  67. Bagel (Yiddish) – A ring-shaped bread roll, typically boiled and then baked.
  68. Bonanza (Spanish) – A situation or event that brings great wealth, success, or fortune.
  69. Fandango (Spanish) – A lively Spanish or Latin American dance, often accompanied by music.
  70. Manga (Japanese) – A style of Japanese comic books and graphic novels.
  71. Magnum opus (Latin) – The greatest work or achievement of an artist, writer, or composer.
  72. Ad infinitum (Latin) – To infinity; without limit or end.
  73. Joie de vivre (French) – “Joy of living” or “Zest for life.”
  74. Shampoo (Hindi) – A liquid or cream used for cleaning the hair and scalp.
  75. Futon (Japanese) – A traditional Japanese mattress or a sofa that can be converted into a bed.
  76. Salsa (Spanish) – A lively, rhythmic Latin American dance or a spicy sauce typically made from tomatoes, onions, and peppers.
  77. Gesundheit (German) – A polite response when someone sneezes, equivalent to “Bless you.”
  78. Kremlin (Russian) – The fortified complex in Moscow housing the Russian government and associated historical buildings.
  79. Château (French) – A castle or a large country house, particularly in France.
  80. Gourmet (French) – Relating to high-quality, fine food and drink.
  81. Manga (Japanese) – A style of Japanese comic books and graphic novels.
  82. Macho (Spanish) – Describing a man who is aggressively masculine or displays exaggerated male traits.
  83. Fiasco (Italian) – A complete failure or disaster.
  84. Habeas corpus (Latin) – A legal principle that protects against unlawful detention, ensuring a person’s right to appear in court.
  85. Mardi Gras (French) – “Fat Tuesday,” referring to the carnival celebrations before the Christian fasting period of Lent.
  86. Namaste (Hindi) – A respectful greeting or farewell, often accompanied by a gesture of placing the palms together in front of the chest.
  87. Ombudsman (Swedish) – An official appointed to investigate and resolve complaints or disputes, often in a public or governmental organization.
  88. Siesta (Spanish) – A short nap or rest taken in the early afternoon, particularly in hot climates.
  89. Soiree (French) – An evening party or social gathering, often characterized by elegance or sophistication.
  90. Yen (Japanese) – The currency of Japan.
  91. Zenith (Arabic) – The highest point or culmination of something.
  92. En route (French) – On the way or in transit.
  93. Faux pas (French) – A social mistake or blunder, often violating accepted customs or norms.
  94. Hoi polloi (Greek) – The common people or the masses.
  95. Laissez-faire (French) – A policy or attitude of non-interference or non-intervention.
  96. Magnum opus (Latin) – The greatest work or achievement of an artist, writer, or composer.
  97. RSVP (French) – An abbreviation for “Répondez s’il vous plaît,” which means “Please respond” or “Kindly reply.”
  98. Vis-à-vis (French) – In relation to or face-to-face with.
  99. Wanderlust (German) – A strong desire to travel and explore the world.
  100. Zeitgeist (German) – The spirit of the times; the general trend or mood of a particular period.

Note: This list includes words from various languages that have been assimilated into the English language and are commonly used in everyday conversations.

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